Category Archives for "Adventures"

Top 5 Cities to Live as a Digital Nomad

Digital Nomad on beach working

As the internet has given people the ability to work remotely, some have abandoned the old lifestyle of being tied to a place and 9-to-5 job.

Digital nomads travel the world, working from places as diverse and bohemian as an internet cafe in Prague or a beach in Bali.

Their geographically independent lifestyle lets them choose the cities with the lowest living costs, best climate or best local food.

Whether you are a writer, teacher, web developer, engineer, programmer or designer, here are the best places in the world to live as a digital nomad:

1. Bali, Indonesia

Ubud Bali Rice Fields

Bali is an Indonesian island known for its beautiful beaches, breathtaking mountain views and diverse wildlife.

It’s hard to imagine a more exciting and exotic place to live. Whether you want to see a live volcano, go on a safari, explore a monkey forest or enjoy one of the most complex cuisines in the world, Bali has something to offer to everyone.

The affordable rent and great WiFi connection have made Bali an extremely popular place for digital nomads in the past years.

Cost

The cost of living in Bali is a mere $900 USD a month.

2. Prague, Czech Republic

Prague Sunset Old Town

The capital of the Czech Republic, Prague is the fifth most visited city in Europe.

Prague is full of cultural attractions which survived the world wars, such as:

Not to mention many world-class museums, galleries and concert halls.

With good WiFi, a more than affordable cost of living, great public transportation, and an amazing nightlife, Prague is currently one of the upward trending destinations for digital nomads.

Costs

About $800 a month.

3. Phuket City, Thailand

Startup Style Soloprenuer in Phuket

Phuket, the largest island in Thailand, is a veritable paradise of turquoise waters and white beaches.

You can explore beaches and lagoons, practice water sports, enjoy the mix of Chinese and colonial architecture or visit the Buddhist temple of Wat Chalong, the spiritual center of Phuket.

Cost

The living expenses for a digital nomad in Phuket amount to a mere $800 a month, including housing and eating out three times a day, as well as fast WiFi connection.

4. Hanoi, Vietnam

Hanoi Boats on Water

Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam and its second largest city, lies on the bank of the Red River.

With its busy streets, delicious street food, many bars and cafes and extremely low cost of living, Hanoi is attracting more digital nomads every year.

Cost

Hanoi also offers fast WiFi and several great coworking spaces, which are bustling with entrepreneurs and startups, making it easy to get inspired and start connections. The living expenses in Hanoi are around $700 a month.

5. San Jose, Costa Rica

San Jose Costa Rica National Theatre Statue

Costa Rica is one of the most popular places in Latin America for digital nomads, especially for those who enjoy nature.

With its great beaches, natural parks and a myriad of natural attractions, Costa Rica is the ideal place to work remotely.

San Jose, the capital, is renowned for its great food and nightlife.

For those who enjoy activities such as yoga and surfing, Santa Teresa offers a more relaxed lifestyle.

Cost

The cost of living in Costa Rica is about $1,500 a month.


The internet has revolutionized the way people live and work, bringing with it more flexibility and freedom.

Increasing numbers of people are abandoning crowded offices and polluted cities to work from idyllic places in the world, where the food and beaches are exceptional and the costs of living are much lower than in most Western cities.

Not only can such a nomadic lifestyle be cheaper than living in the same place all the time, but it gives you the opportunity to experience new places and cultures, which can be a boost to your creativity.

Quick Guide to Visiting Tokyo

Quick Guide to Visiting Tokyo

Visiting a foreign country alone can be challenging, especially if you don’t know the local language; however, you can easily access Tokyo by hiring a travel guide to help you.

Tokyo has so much to offer from the colorful and busy streets to the serene parks, beautiful landscape, and rich history and culture. There are many attractions in Tokyo, and you will never be bored during your visit.

Guide to Tokyo: What to do in Tokyo

Apart from delicious cuisines, Tokyo has many exciting activities for you, for instance, singing karaoke with the city’s residents or visiting the Imperial Palace. The city incorporates both modern and traditional elements.

The list below will guide you on places to visit and exciting activities to do:

At the Airport

There are 2 International airports in the city; Narita International Airport and Haneda Airport. Although the latter is closer to the city, few international flights use it compared to the former which has many connections.

Since you will most likely use Narita International Airport, you can use the Narita Express, Taxis, Tokyo Airport Bus, or the Keisei Skyliner. Choose the most suitable transportation, depending on your budget and where you will be staying.

Navigating the City using the Tokyo Map

Navigating Tokyo with Map

Although the population of Tokyo is over 30 million, their public transport is one of the best in the world. You can use the trains or the subways to get around town.

Your Tokyo guide can show you various sites during the multiple stops. Since you are only visiting and not going to work, avoid using the train or subway during the rush hour as the locals will be hurrying to work.

The taxis are also convenient to use, especially where the trains cannot access. You can also use the bus, and an excellent way to do this is to use a Pasmo card. You top up the card and use it for your travel experiences instead of carrying cash.

Accommodation

where to stay in Tokyo

The city has numerous hotels depending on how much you plan to spend on accommodation.

Your Tokyo map should guide you on the locations of different hotels depending on the district.

Remember that hotel rates change with seasons, for instance, the prices are slightly higher in spring. You can stay in hotels, traditional inns (Ryokan), capsule hotels, guesthouses or a local home using AirBnB.

Where to Eat

Eating in Tokyo

Some of the places to visit in Tokyo are their eateries. You cannot leave without trying various delicacies such as sushi, their unique noodles, and many more. There are affordable restaurants that serve traditional and vegan cuisines.

If you would like to taste many traditional delicacies you need to dine like a local.

Use a Tokyo map to navigate to places like Ueno where you can eat buckwheat noodles served with chicken and Japanese leeks. You don’t have to worry about prices because here you will find local joints with reasonable prices. You can also visit Shibuya for inexpensive, delicious sushi.

Places to Visit in Tokyo

What to see in Tokyo

There are so many places to visit in Tokyo, for instance, the Tokyo National Museum to view the largest collection of Japanese artifacts and art, which includes many national treasures.

The Meiji Shrine is among the most significant Tokyo attractions. It incorporates traditional designs with nature. This shrine provides a serene environment, and you might be lucky to experience a wedding taking place here.

Meiji Wedding Ceremonies

If you’re a history lover, visit the Senso-ji temple, which dates back before the Second World War. Although most of the parts were destroyed in the war, it was restored to its former glory.

This temple should be on your Tokyo sightseeings list because of its unique features. The entrance is fortified with a gigantic Thunder Gate and hanging lights.

Things to Do

Every city has unique activities to offer its visitors.

When you don’t know where to start, you can consult Tokyo travel guides who will assist you in planning your visit.

For instance, you can visit the Robot Restaurant. Located in Shinjuku district, this restaurant showcases Japan’s culture through dancing and songs. They use robots in the shows which run throughout the day till 10.00 PM. There are lots of flashy lights, colors, and interior décor is full of colorful decorations. If you arrive early, you can get the time to explore around and take a few selfies.

Robot Restaurant

The Robot Restaurant in Shinjuku is a must stop on your Tokyo journey.

Another unique thing about Tokyo is the presence of pet cafes. Although cat cafes are not new, the pet cafes here incorporate other animals such as rabbits, owls, hedgehogs and more.

The Tokyo guide can help you to locate several pet cafes, depending on your taste, we’ve linked to a few below.

Tokyo Shopping

The best thing about visiting a new place is shopping and taking back unique items. Tokyo shopping provides you with traditional designs, housewares, high-end fashion, vintage attire as well as souvenirs.

If you are a fashion enthusiast, you need to visit Ginza which has luxurious boutiques, department stores, and a fashion mall. If you love electronics, Akihabara is the place to be where you can watch avid video game players showcase their skills.

Conclusion

Tokyo is a great city to visit where you will have fun until the last day. You can consult a Tokyo guide to help with planning the trip. Apart from the beautiful sites, the locals are quite friendly, and you are bound to enjoy your experience.

Author Bio:

Catherine Wiley is a freelance writer who loves traveling around the world and documenting her experiences. She loves writing about traveling to places where the locals value their culture and where she can indulge in traditional delicacies. She researchers extensively to ensure that she provides useful information to her readers at gearexpertguides.com.

All About Sushi – Japanese Vinegared Rice

Sushi Set and Chopsticks

It’s a common misconception with Japanese cuisine that sushi means raw fish, and while the jokes about eating it for the first time can be funny, it’s also misleading.

Like this old chestnut: A couple walk into a Japanese restaurant and pause to admire a tank full of tropical fish. They ask the waiter what the fish are called. “Sushi,” the waiter replies. But as any good waiter would know, sushi actually refers to the vinegared rice, with which raw fish – called sashimi – is often served.

Sushi actually refers to the vinegared rice, with which raw fish – called sashimi – is often served.

Sushi is believed to have started 14 centuries ago, when a common method of pickling fish and rice gained popularity in Japan.

Bamboo Sushi Roller, two hands, rice

The fish was slit open and packed with rice, and as the whole thing fermented for anything up to two years it took on a tangy pickled flavor. Later this process was speeded up, and later still, 19th century food stall owner Hanaya Yohei started creating sushi dishes with vinegared rice and raw fish in Tokyo.

In the 1970s, sushi travelled to the US and other parts of the world, and became part of a new age food revolution. Out of the simple seaweed, rice and raw fish combinations came the California Roll, characteristically bigger than the Japanese delicacies and packed with fish, meat and vegetables and wrapped in a sheet of seaweed, or presented ‘inside out’ with the rice on the outside and the seaweed tucked away with the filling.

California Roll

But Japanese sushi chefs continued to evolve the delicacies known collectively as sushi into ever more graceful art forms.

There are several different forms of sushi, including:

  • maki-sushi, which is the ‘inside out’ sushi that evolved into the California Roll;
  • Nigiri Sushi, which is vinegared rice shaped by hand into a small bed for seafood;
  • oshi sushi, which is sushi rice shaped into squares or rectangles and covered with a variety of toppings;
  • chirashi sushi, which is vinegared rice scattered on a plate and served with toppings.

To make sushi at home you need to buy the right ingredients.

There are only two of them – Japanese short grain rice and sushi rice vinegar. You can get them both from an Asian grocery store.

  1. Rinse two cups of rice in a colander under a running tap to remove the starch and ensure the rice is sticky when cooked.
  2. Put the washed rice into a large pot, and add two cups of water, or into a rice cooker following the manufacturer’s instructions. If in a pot, bring it to the boil, turn down the heat and simmer until the rice has absorbed all the water.

Japanese Short Grain Rice

Your Asian grocery store may stock sushi rice vinegar, pre-mixed and ready to use.

If not, buy rice vinegar and mix half a cup of vinegar with three tablespoons of white sugar and 1 teaspoon of salt in a small pan.

Heat until sugar dissolves, and sprinkle over the rice in a non-metal bowl. Mix thoroughly with a spatula, and your sushi rice is ready to roll and shape, using a sushi fan as you work to cool the rice. Store any leftover sushi vinegar in the fridge.

Whether you choose to make maki, nigiri, oshi or chirashi sushi, it is important to have the freshest ingredients possible.

Raw fish, such as tuna and salmon, are among the most commonly used ingredients, but if you cannot obtain these really fresh from the ocean, you will be better off using canned, smoked or cooked fish.

Avocado is a popular ingredient in California Rolls and most sushi sold today, but you can also include carrot sticks, celery, prawns, crab, chicken, lettuce strips, tomato and cucumber.

cutting sashimi in kitchen

If you are rolling the sushi in seaweed sheets, a bamboo hand rolling mat (see photo above) will make the job easier.

This won’t stop people making jokes about raw fish, of course, but at least while you are laughing, you can gently correct them as you hand them your own delicious sushi creations.

Bonus: How to Make Sushi [Video]

More Heroic Adventures

10 Intimidating Facts About Scaling the Seven Summits

Everest Header Image

If you don’t think you have the strength, willpower or mental fortitude to climb the highest peaks on every single continent, you’re not alone–only around 350 people, as of January 2012, have actually had the guts–and money–to accomplish this formidable task.

Adding to the challenge is the fact that, depending on whom you talk to, there are actually eight summits to climb if you want to have truly mastered this feat. If you dream big about mountaineering, wait a tic–scaling these majestic peaks is much more intimidating than you might have ever imagined.

1. The Eight Summits (Or Is It Nine?)

Disputes about geographical boundaries mean that the Seven Summits have evolved into eight summits–when Dick Bass first completed the challenge in 1985, he climbed these seven peaks:

  1. Aconcagua (South America)
  2. McKinley (North American)
  3. Vinson (Antarctica)
  4. Kilimanjaro (Africa)
  5. Kosciusko (Australia)
  6. Elbrus (Europe)
  7. Everest (Asia)

This is known as the “Bass List.”

However, Pat Morrow, another climber to scale the mountains early on, determined that another peak, Carstensz Pyramid (also known as Puncak Jaya) was the highest point on the Australian continent–not Kosciusko.

Puncak Jaya 4884 meters tall Papua New Guinea

Carstensz is reputed to be significantly more challenge due to its steep vertical incline.

Morrow justified his decision by saying that the continental shelf on which Carstensz Pyramid resides is part of the Australian continent.

Reinhold Messner, a noted mountaineer, agreed with Morrow, and this variation become known as the “Messner List.”

Of the 350 people who have laid claim to completing the Seven Summits, just 30 percent have climbed both Kosciuszko and Carstensz–meaning they’ve done all eight summits. The latter is a more technically challenging climb and at 4,884 meters (16,023.6 feet), it’s more than double Kosciuszko’s 2,228 meters (7,309.7 feet). 

There’s another controversy about the European mountain; however, it’s not widespread enough to make a switch on either of the official lists:

Mount Elbrus, Europe’s highest peak at 5,642 meters (18,510) feet, is located on the Asia-Europe border as part of the Caucasus Range.

The majority of geographers place the peak in Europe; however, a few claim it’s actually in Asia–and that would make Mount Blanc Europe’s highest peak at 4,810 meters (15,781 feet). Therefore, you might someday have to scale nine mountains to truly be victorious.

Mount Elbrus

Mount Elbrus, Europe’s highest peak at 5,642 meters (18,510)

2. You Need Around $200K

The total sum to climb all Seven Summits varies widely based on your approach, your gear, your team and other factors. Generally speaking, though, it’s a pretty hefty chunk of change — a ballpark resides anywhere between $130,000 to $220,000.

The most expensive peak to climb, by far, is Mount Everest, which the website estimates at around $60,000 to $87,000. Time magazine places the price tag even higher at up to $100,000. The least-expensive is Aconcagua at just $850 to $5,000.

Aconcagua

Aconcagua, reputedly the most affordable of the 7 summits to climb.

However, that’s just for the luxury of stepping foot on the mountains; don’t forget to add in $8,000 to $13,000 worth of gear, not just hiking poles, and clothing, another $5k to $8k for training and $9,000 to nearly $23,000 in airfare, depending on where you’re coming and going from.

On top of the costs, it takes a lot of your time to go on these expeditions.

Mount Everest alone takes an average of six to seven weeks to climb, even though it only takes five days to reach the summit–you must acclimate to the thin air for safety purposes.

Therefore, holding down a job can be quite difficult unless you have the most understanding of employers–or a whole lot of vacation time.

4. You Just Might Die

There’s no official report as to how many people have died climbing all Seven Summits.

However, as of 2013, nearly 250 people had died trying to ascend Mount Everest alone–and then in April 2014, another 16 were killed in one day in one horrific avalanche.

Africa Mt Kilimanjar Summit Sign

Kilimanjaro summit, the roof of Africa.

Every year, 10 deaths are reported on Mount Kilimanjaro, though the numbers are conflicting. In January 2009, five people died climbing Aconcagua. In other words, these mountains are deadly.

Death comes from altitude sickness, falls and hypothermia, to name a few possible maladies.

On some mountains, such as Everest, the risk and cost of recovering a dead body is too high–meaning future climbers can still see the eerie forms lying in the ice as they make their own ascent.

In fact, more than 200 dead bodies are still on Everest. Climbers have to maneuver past them on their way to the summit.

5. The Summits Total 150,000 Feet

The total elevation of all the eight summits put together equals 45,592 meters (149,580 feet). That’s approximately five times the height of the average airliner’s cruising altitude of 30,000 feet.

The highest elevation is, naturally, Mount Everest at 8,848 meters (29,035 feet), while the lowest is Kosciuszko at 2,228 meters (7,310 feet). If you exclude this mountain from the list, the lowest is Carstensz Pyramid at 4,884 meters (16,024 feet).

6. It’s Pretty Cold Up There

You know that $8,000 to $13,000 you spent on gear and clothing to climb? It just might be worth it, as you’ll need warm clothing in these conditions.

It’s best to climb Mount Elbrus in July and August, but even then temperatures at night average a balmy 18 F (minus 8 C)–but that’s downright warm compared to some of the other peaks.

At night on the Carstensz Pyramid, the summit can be around 14 F (minus 10 C) and it rains for several hours a day.

On Everest, summit temperatures range from minus 4 F to minus 31 F, with wind speeds of up to 175 mph.

At Mount McKinley, also known as Denali, temperatures in early May–the earliest time of year you can begin to safely climb–can hover around minus 50F.

7. Getting to the Mountain

In some cases, it’s no easy feat to simply arrive at the base of the mountain to begin to climb.

To reach Carstensz Pyramid, for example, you have to make your way through West Papua New Guinea’s tropical jungle.

Add in government issues, political instability and tribal wars and it’s no wonder that it’s one of the least-climbed of the Seven Summits.

Even the trek to the base camp of Everest means getting to 17,590 feet–higher than the summit of some of the other mountains on the list. Some climbers choose to simply make the journey to the base camp, a difficult hike with a rewarding payoff that’s significantly less dangerous than going to the very top.

Everest Base Camp

Everest base camp, some climbers only venture this far and have no intention of reaching the peak.

So many of the mountains are remote, as well, meaning that getting medical help in an emergency can be difficult. As you might expect from its location in Antarctica, the area surrounding Mount Vinson is entirely undeveloped. While Vinson’s not a technically challenging climb, the cold and location make it extremely risky.

8. There’s actually a “Death Zone”

That’s right–a death zone.

This is where the altitude is so high that the risk of death increases substantially.

It’s found on Mount Everest above approximately 8,000 meters (26,246 feet). Your body cannot replenish its oxygen store at this height, as there’s only one-third as much oxygen in the air as at sea level. If you have asthma, you might want to skip this one.

9. You Won’t Be the Youngest

If you thought you might be able to break a record due to your age, think again.

After scaling Vinson in Antarctica on December 24, 2011, then-15-year-old Jordan Romero became the youngest person to officially scale the seven peaks. The American-born Romero beat the previous record, set earlier in 2011 by a 16-year-old Brit.

Moun Vinson

Mount Vinson, one of the Seven Summits located in Antarctica.

Setting records wasn’t new to the teen; he conquered Mount Everest at age 13.

Unlike some other climbers, Romero has scaled both Carstensz Pyramid and Kosciuszko.

It took Romero six years to achieve all Seven Summits, compared to the record-holding 134 days achieved in 2010 by Vern Tejas–who once held the record as the youngest Seven Summits climber.

10. Next Up: The Second Summits

The final intimidation factor of climbing the Seven Summits is realizing that, despite this achievement, some serious climbers might still scoff at you for not having done the harder versions–that is, the more technically challenging, albeit slightly lower, second-highest summits on each continent.

This is comprised of the following more difficult and deadly mountains:

  1. K2 (Asia)
  2. Ojos del Salad (South America)
  3. Mount Logan (North America)
  4. Mount Kenya (Africa)
  5. Mount Tyree (Antarctica)
  6. Dychtau (Europe)
  7. Puncak Trikora (Australia)

However, you’ll be in good company, as all seven Second Summits weren’t scaled until 2012 when Hans Kammerlander completed the challenge. He remains the only person to have completed this feat.

The difference in danger between K2 and Mount Everest, both located in Asia, is particularly notable; in 2009 and 2010, nobody attempted to scale K2 at all because of potential death. Additionally, while Everest has a 4.14 percent death rate, K2’s is 26.47 percent. That means that approximately 1 in every 4 climbers that attempts K2 loses their life doing so.

Do you have the mental fortitude to scale all Seven Summits?

Do so, and you’ll go down in history as one of just a few hundred who have been able to do so.

Adventures Await – What Mountains Will You Conquer?

Southeast Asia: A 6-Week Travel Itinerary

Wat Arun with boat speeding by in front

Southeast Asia is one of the most popular destinations in the world for backpackers.

Comprised of eleven countries, this region offers rich variation in culture, customs, and tourist attractions.

Six weeks is more than enough time to see the best of the region, but it can be difficult to plan a good itinerary.  

You might be tempted to visit all eleven countries, but you're better off focusing on three or four of them if you want to avoid a rushed experience.

Week 1: Bangkok and Sukhothai

Sukhothai Thailand

Begin your trip with an assault on the senses in Bangkok, Thailand’s capital city.

This sprawling metropolis is full of roadside street food stalls serving up delicious local cuisine until all hours, and a wild nightlife scene that doesn’t stop until sunrise.

Bangkok also features many must-see attractions, including Wat Arun, shown in main article image above, a majestic riverside temple, and the stunning Grand Palace, the former residence of Thailand’s royalty.

When you’ve had enough of Bangkok, travel north to explore the ancient ruins of Sukhothai.

The UNESCO World Heritage Sukhothai Historical Park features ruins from the ancient Sukhothai Kingdom of the 13th and 14th centuries.

Week 2: Chiang Mai

Lanterns in air with Doi Suthep in Background

After Sukhothai, you can catch a bus or a train to Chiang Mai.

Popular among expats and tourists alike, Chiang Mai is a place you’re likely to fall in love with.

Surrounded by lush jungle and mountainous scenery, Chiang Mai is the perfect location to go hiking, white-water rafting, or motorcycling. There are also some great night markets in the city, selling all manner of souvenirs and delicious food.

The people of Chiang Mai are friendly, and the Lanna culture of the north is worth learning about because it’s distinctly different from the rest of the country.

Be sure to treat yourself to a Thai massage when you’re in Chiang Mai because the city is famous for its spa and wellness centres.

Week 3: Northern Laos and Luang Prabang

Wat Xieng Thong

The next stage of your journey takes you to Luang Prabang, a tranquil city in the north of Laos.

You’ll travel by two-day slow boat from the border town of Huay Xai, just a five-hour bus ride from Chiang Mai. The slow boat offers ample opportunity to relax while you take in the beautiful scenery of the Mekong river.

When you arrive in Luang Prabang, prepare to fall in love with its charm.

You’ll also be impressed with how clean it is. Simply sit along the waterfront and relax with some delicious Laotian food while you watch the sunset. Be sure to check out the Kuang Si waterfall when you’re in town because it is one of the most magnificent waterfalls in Southeast Asia.

Week 4: Vang Vieng and Vientiane

Reclning Buddha

Surrounded by a gorgeous karst landscape, Vang Vieng is a great place to relax for a few days.

Vang Vieng is a three-hour bus journey from Luang Prabang, and you’ll want to keep your eyes open for this trip because the scenery is incredible.

The town itself formerly had a reputation as a party town, but this has changed recently due to a government crackdown and because many young tourist were injured and even died while inebriated and partying in the water.

The main attraction of Vang Vieng is tubing. This involves riding down the Nam Song River on a rubber ring while you admire the glorious scenery.

The capital city of Laos, Vientiane, is just three hours from Vang Vieng.

While it’s not a hectic city like other capital cities in this region, Vientiane is a charming place to spend time.

You can go temple-hopping for a day and then relax in the evening with a beer beside the Mekong river.

Vientiane is also a great place to get to know Laotian cuisine, and it’s a good idea to do a cookery course in the city before moving on to Cambodia.

Week 5: Phnom Penh and Angkor Wat

Walkway across Killing fields in Phonm Penh Cambodia@CJMoore

The capital city of Phnom Penh is a good place to start in Cambodia because you get to learn about the country’s dark history under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s.

Visit the heartbreaking Killing Fields where the Cambodian dictator Pol Pot sent millions of people to be executed. Phnom Penh isn’t the happiest place to go, but it’s important to learn about the country’s tragic past.

The next part of your journey takes you to the stunning Angkor Wat temple complex in Siem Reap.

This attraction often makes it to the top of the world’s must-see destinations, and it’s easy to see why.

The complex was built by King Suryavarman II during the period of the Khmer Empire in Cambodia. Prepare to be blown away by both the size of the complex and the intricate architecture.

Week 6: Kampot and Otres Beach

Cambodia Pepper Farm Kampot Southeast Asia Itinerary

The final leg of your journey is in the south of Cambodia.

Your first stop is Kampot, a sleepy riverside town famous for the production of peppercorns. You can visit temples, go to the local markets, or even visit a peppercorn farm. Make sure to try some crab with Kampot pepper for a truly delicious Cambodian dish.

Finally, you can spend a couple of days on stunning Otres Beach. With pristine white sand and clear turquoise water, Otres Beach is an idyllic location.

Feel free to relax by the sea with some Cambodian food, and get a cheap foot massage. This slice of paradise is the perfect way to finish your six-week trip in Southeast Asia.